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Meat the Butcher: Prime Rib

November 30, 2011

Today we are exploring a legendary cut of meat known for its supreme quality and rich, succulent flavor. The prime rib is a highly coveted piece of meat that usually draws long lines at dinner parties and holiday gatherings. It is festive, comforting, classic and a definite crowd-pleaser! So we are going to help you prep for those holiday parties by giving you the details on this renowned cut of beef.

CUT: The prime rib is from the primal rib, the area behind the shoulder, but above the lower back.  It is one of the eight primal cuts of beef and includes some of the most tender muscles on the entire animal. This cut can be comprised of 2 to 7 ribs and comes from ribs 6 through 12 on the animal.

FLAVOR: The prime rib offers a generous amount of marbling, which contributes to its juiciness and flavor. When choosing a cut, make sure to look for one with bright red meat and milky-white fat that is evenly distributed around the cut and on the ends. If you need a recommendation, just ask one of our butchers!

COOKING: This particular cut is also known as the standing rib roast because it is usually cooked in a standing position with the ribs stacked vertically. Our butchers have come up with a simple way to make sure your prime rib is juicy and tender with just the right amount of flavorful char and a perfect crust. The Meat House Prime Rib Roast recipe uses Camp Mix to bring out the natural flavors of the beef and a searing technique to lock them in.

The Meat House Prime Rib Roast

Serves 5-6

Ingredients

1 3-bone Prime Rib Roast- boned, rolled and tied (our butchers can do this for you, just ask!)

3 Tbsps. Camp Mix Seasoning

Instructions

Preheat your oven to 250 degrees and season the meat with the Camp Mix. Pre-heat a large, metal-handled skillet to high. Sear the roast on all sides- about 3 minutes per side or until the meat starts to develop a dark crust.

Carefully put the skillet into the oven, bone side down. Cook the roast until a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat registers 130 degrees (about 25 minutes per pound). Let the roast sit for fifteen minutes out of the oven. Cut the twine, remove the bones and carve.

Serve with your favorite holiday sides, Jingle Bells playing in the background and good company gathered around! To pre-order your holiday roast this season, simply visit or call your local Meat House!

2 comments

  1. This is exactly the method I’ve used for years…thanks to Cooks Illustrated. I tried lots of other techniques, but this one is fool proof and is never over cooked.

    Sear…then low and slow is the way to go!


  2. great recipe



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